Lifetime Member Recognition

The Honorary Lifetime Membership award is bestowed to a small but very distinguished group of individuals who have been recoginized for providing a significant period of years of extraordinary service to The Terrace Little Theatre Society.

Amy Turner

Amy Turner

Amy Turner has been an active member of TLT since 1988, if not earlier, when she played a
Munchkin in Merry Hallsor’s production of the musical, “The WIZ”.
Since that time, she served on the Board for many years, and worked backstage in every capacity.
Most famously, Amy sang and danced the boards in the “Nunsense” musicals as Sister Leo (garnering
an Honorary Mention at Mainstage 2006).
She acted in numerous comedies and dramas including “Better Living”, “Marion Bridge”, “The
Importance of Being Earnest”, “Sinners”, “Steel Magnolias”, “Boeing, Boeing”, “The Odd Couple:
Female Version”, “The Foursome”, “Cruel Tears”, “Maggie’s Getting Married“, “Karaoke Killer”, “I
Buried an Idol”; the pantomimes “Cinderella”, “ Puss in Boots”, “ Jack and the Beanstalk”, and
“Treasure Island”.
Amy worked backstage on more plays than can be counted, including “The Best Brothers”, “Wicked
Women and One Lone Wolf”, “Criminal Hearts”, and many more, that others can attest to. There is
not one year when Amy did not contribute to the Terrace Little Theatre in some meaningful way.

Gayle Holtom

Gayle Holtom

Alan Weston

Alan Weston

After being away from theatre for 10 years; Alan Weston joined the Terrace Little Theatre in 1987 when he was cast as a drunken cook in Heaven’s to Betsy. The very next year Alan was back as the Scarecrow in “The Wiz” sharing the  REM Lee stage with not only a large community cast but also his daughter Sarah. Alan recalls a favourite memory; that after the Saturday Matinee a little girl came up to him very wide eyed and said “Mr Scarecrow you are my favourite character and I have read all your books” Throughout the following decades Alan was a mainstay of the Terrace Little Theatre world. 

In 1991 he was awarded Theatre BC’s Burnaby Trophy for his outstanding performance and presentation of Alan Bennett’s Talking Heads monologue “A Chip in the Sugar”

The following years often found Alan at the McColl Playhouse. He often took challenging roles under the direction of his wife Marianne Brorup Weston: Robert in “A Life in the Theatre”, Tom in “Better Living”, Kemp in “Vigil”, roles for which Alan received the Skeena Zone award for best actor. After first experiencing Theatre BC’s MainStage with “Curse of the Starving Class” in 1989, Alan became a frequent traveller there where he performed both onstage and off supporting the Terrace Little Theatre’s productions. Alan has stage managed multiple productions, often organizing and facilitating travelling shows; which means Alan did a lot of driving. Alan quips that he has met a lot of small town mechanics over the years driving the TLT truck all over the province. He has spent time in all the booth chairs managing lights, sound and stage. He has wielded a drill to put up a set in a four hour tech time and organized many set strikes.

Alan has had a long tenure on the board of the Skeena Zone and helped facilitate many educational opportunities for amateur theatre groups throughout the northwest.

Alan has also been a fixture on the Terrace Little Theatre executive serving in many capacities including president.

Julie Jacobs

Julie Jacobs

Julies love of theatre began when she was 4 years old and played the angel Gabriel in a Sunday school play. Both of her parents were involved in amateur theatre while she was growing up.

Wanting to get back on the boards after her children were older, Julie joined Terrace Little Theatre in 1995 having been given the role of Lizzie Borden in “Blood Relations”. Hoping not to have been typecast, Julie also played some other pretty wicked women over her time on the boards. The most recent in 2015 being Carabose, aka Maleficent, in “Wicked women and one lone wolf”. In 2003 she played Cinderella, (a good girl!) which was her first time in a pantomime, and also working with a live pony on stage!

Over the years, Julie has worn many hats in theatre life; Actor, director, stage manager, ASM, set painter and line coach to name a few. She also served on the board of directors for many years, first as recording secretary and then as vice president and bar manager.

In 2015 she was awarded a lifetime membership in the TLT, something she feels humbled and honoured by.

Julie has an enormous trove of fond memories from the shows shes been involved in, and the amazing people that shared the ride with her over the years.

Having had a lifetime loving the stage, the TLT has always been a home away from home.

Karla Henning

Karla Henning

Marianne Brorup Weston

Marianne Brorup Weston

Marianne thinks she was always doing some form of theatre. When she was five, she started drawing and colouring, quickly drawing small crowds of nuns, teachers and students watching her, which she pretended not to enjoy. She graduated to bullying her little sisters’ colouring book efforts, assigning and policing colours, enforcing rules and chain of command. From there she branched out to recitals and speeches. She developed an unnatural interest in art and history, spending her spare time listening to radio plays.  Her graduation year, she managed to claim the role of Myfanwy Price in “Under Milkwood”; her yearbook reveals she was “quite the little actress”. Off she went to art school, cementing her dedication to the arts.

Of course, Marianne managed to pick someone in theatre as her husband. Pregnant with their first they threw caution to the wind and left their arty jobs in Toronto for the wild west of Terrace, BC. Fast-forward 20 years they had four children. One day Alan announced he was auditioning for a musical at the local amateur theatre.  “Heavens to Betsy” took place at the REM Lee. Marianne was gob-smacked. The set was stunningly beautiful, designed by David Battison.  Alan played a drunken ship’s cook. I designed the poster graphic. Merry Hallsor was the director. Merry ran a tight ship and the show was a huge hit.

When Merry put out a call for “The Wiz,” Marianne volunteered to draw the costumes for customer Roselynn Fleury.  Marianne  would visit Merry Hallsor’s house with Sharon Lynch, chain-smoking, and solving theatre problems. It was quite the education.

Next, Marianne was on stage as a 14-year-old boy, a live lamb in her arms, in “Curse of the Starving Class”. Which ended up at Theatre BC’s Mainstage. Through the Mainstage experience, she befriended professional actors and directors and she never turned away an opportunity to learn from them. Likewise, Marianne credits learning much from her community theatre peers. To this day, she has dear theatre friends across the province, indeed across the country.

Some irritated people began to tell Marianne that she was full of opinions and so busy bossing everyone around, she should probably direct her own play. She chose “The Glass Bottle” and cast Lorna Morton and Margaret Sinjur  She believes they were very kind to her. Mouthing off at a Theatre BC meeting and the next thing, Marianne knew she was a Vice President, then President for three years. Taking her cue from Merry Hallsor, she fiercely championed the north and the right to access the same supports as down south. She continues in that role at Zone level, to this day.

Marianne has lost count of the plays she directed, the times she acted, the times she directed Alan, or he stage-managed her. Marianne has some proud moments, but thanks to Tim Keenan, finding her way into and through musical theatre with “Nunsense” is a favourite; stunningly, it won the Burnaby Trophy at Mainstage in 2006.

Her next goal is to honour her promise to Larry Guno, and finally stage his play, “Bunk #7”, a dream 20 years in the making.

Marianne believes community theatre is a family: “We are an ensemble – greater than the sum of our parts”.

Sharon Lynch

Sharon Lynch

Sharon Lynch was born in 1941 in Rosetown, Saskatchewan. After marriage she and husband Jim moved to Terrace to raise their four children. She joined the Terrace Little Theatre in 1965. Spanning over 40 years Sharon was an integral part of the TLT. Sharon really did do it all from emptying chamber pots in the furnace room of the old community centre to directing plays.  A talented actress, Sharon beguiled audiences in innumerable productions including “Bus Stop”, “A Streetcar Named Desire” (Best Supporting Actress at Mainstage), “Father of the Bride”, “Waiting for the Parade”, “Harvey”, “The Watering Place” (Best Actress SKZ), “Ravenscroft”, “Vigil” (Best Supporting Actress SKZ and HM Mainstage), “Murder is a Game” and “Maggie’s Getting Married”.

Sharon loved to act, but she also had a keen eye for design. From the tiniest makeup detail to the broad strokes of colour scheme or set design, Sharon had something to contribute. Not just in words. At times she was found crawling around the concrete auditorium floor, painting it to look like a vintage attic, decorating a glossily lacquered rickshaw, or repainting the TLT resident fixture – a wingback chair – to look like weathered leather. Her opinions on costume were not for the faint of heart,  and it paid to listen because her eye knew what was needed. Her backstage quick-change costume lessons were legendary, if not a bit frightening to the uncooperative actor. Should TLT be in need of a piece of furniture, all you had to do was ring up Sharon and explain the problem. Usually this resulted in Sharon arriving at the McColl Playhouse, single-handedly staggering towards the building, hauling various pieces of furniture apparently lurking in her home to the auditorium.

In later years Sharon became a constant, supporting actors who needed to learn lines, in the dressing room calming nerves, fixing eyeliner, and supplying lemon drops.

Sharon was intensely loyal to the Skeena Zone and Theatre BC, tirelessly promoting the value of being part of the incredible kinship between Clubs, Zones and the provincial office. She served on the TLT Board, and as Club Rep and Zone Chair. She received Skeena Zone’s coveted Tom Rooney Award in 1999 for her service to the Skeena Zone.  In 2008 she received the prestigious Theatre BC Eric Hamber Award for her contributions to the theatre community.

Sharon died in 2018

Merry Hallsor

Merry Hallsor

Lorna Morton

Lorna Morton

Ken Morton

Ken Morton

Gordon Oates

Gordon Oates

Flora Bruinink

Flora Bruinink

Molly Natress

Molly Natress

In 1960, Nick and Molly Nattress left Stoke-on-Trent, England, to move their family to Terrace.  Nick came to a job on the Mills Memorial Hospital construction site; soon  afterward, he transitioned to a position with Bill McRae at Skeena Sawmills.

After being impressed by Terrace Little Theatre’s presentation of The Barretts of Wimpole Street, Nick and Molly quickly became involved with productions.  Nick was President of Terrace Little Theatre when the Baptist church was bought and transformed into a home for the club.  Equally busy in the Theatre, Molly was soon an integral part of the theatre community:  lending her home for rehearsals and meetings, serving on the Executive, and directing productions,  However, it was by far her versatility as an actress that made her a valuable member of the TLT.

In 1966, at what was then called the BC Regional Three-Act Drama Festival, Molly was recognized for her acting—after appearing in only five productions.  Molly received the award for Best Performance by an Actress for her work as Meg in Harold Pinter’s The Birthday Party.

Molly was instrumental in TLT’s staging of British-style pantomimes, beginning in 1967 with Jack and the Beanstalk and finishing in 1976 with Cinderella at the R. E. M. Lee Theatre.  

During her tenure as TLT President, the McColl Playhouse received a major facelift, becoming more like the building we recognize today.

In 1977, Molly helped to organize the first of what was to become the long-lasting Summer Drama Days.  That era’s “Summer Theatre School” started the tradition of its graduates growing up and returning as instructors.  

After twenty-three years in Terrace, Nick and Molly returned to England.  The next time you are at the Playhouse, be sure to visit the upstairs “Green Room” where you’ll see the much-treasured wagon wheel table —a Nattress legacy that reminds us of the gift of time and energy that brought us to today.  

Molly Nattress died at her home in Wales in 2012.

Mien Vanheek

Mien Vanheek

Edna Cooper

Edna Cooper

Loreen McColl

Loreen McColl

Bud & Loreen McColl arrived in Terrace in the summer of 1949 with their 6 children.  Loreen immediately joined the United Church’s theatre groups who performed in the old Odd Fellows Hall.  Out of this group the Terrace Little Theatre was formed and formally started with its 1st production of “Father of the Bride” in November 1953.  Loreen directed that show and Bud starred as the father.  The whole family was involved.  Both Robin & Bruce McColl were part of the cast.  Gail McColl painted the flats for the set.  Bonnie McColl did costumes and makeup and worked backstage.  Sheila & Merry were prompters sitting in the front row and feeding their father his lines!  The club continued to thrive and started competing in BC Drama Association’s (forerunner of Theatre BC) festivals and workshops.  Many professional directors were sent up by the UBC extension department, including Sam Paine and Sydney Risk.  Scripts were obtained from the Victoria Lending Library.  Loreen became the secretary of the BC Drama Association for a 2 year term in the late 1950’s and continued her involvement until the early 1970’s when Terrace Little Theatre hosted “Performance ‘76” in the brand new REM Lee Theatre.  Loreen continued to direct many shows while Bud ‘trod the boards’ as well as acting as Treasurer and Fund Raiser for the club for many years.  Their last show together was Agatha Christies “Mousetrap” in 1967.  When Bud & Loreen moved to Lakelse Lake from town in 1968, their involvement became less but they both continued to show their interest and give their support to the club they had founded.

AJ (Bud) McColl

AJ (Bud) McColl

Bud & Loreen McColl arrived in Terrace in the summer of 1949 with their 6 children.  Loreen immediately joined the United Church’s theatre groups who performed in the old Odd Fellows Hall.  Out of this group the Terrace Little Theatre was formed and formally started with its 1st production of “Father of the Bride” in November 1953.  Loreen directed that show and Bud starred as the father.  The whole family was involved.  Both Robin & Bruce McColl were part of the cast.  Gail McColl painted the flats for the set.  Bonnie McColl did costumes and makeup and worked backstage.  Sheila & Merry were prompters sitting in the front row and feeding their father his lines!  The club continued to thrive and started competing in BC Drama Association’s (forerunner of Theatre BC) festivals and workshops.  Many professional directors were sent up by the UBC extension department, including Sam Paine and Sydney Risk.  Scripts were obtained from the Victoria Lending Library.  Loreen became the secretary of the BC Drama Association for a 2 year term in the late 1950’s and continued her involvement until the early 1970’s when Terrace Little Theatre hosted “Performance ‘76” in the brand new REM Lee Theatre.  Loreen continued to direct many shows while Bud ‘trod the boards’ as well as acting as Treasurer and Fund Raiser for the club for many years.  Their last show together was Agatha Christies “Mousetrap” in 1967.  When Bud & Loreen moved to Lakelse Lake from town in 1968, their involvement became less but they both continued to show their interest and give their support to the club they had founded.